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Blog > Rizzuto Show > Rizz News > #RizzNews: Two children dead after SUV flips near Stan Musial Bridge; Man robs bank inside of local Schnucks; AND MORE

#RizzNews: Two children dead after SUV flips near Stan Musial Bridge; Man robs bank inside of local Schnucks; AND MORE

Two children dead after SUV flips near Stan Musial Bridge

Two children died Thursday night after a rollover crash near the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge in downtown.

According to a spokesperson for the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department, the accident happened just before 9:30 p.m. at N. Tucker Boulevard and Cass Avenue. The driver overcorrected on the off-ramp, leading the vehicle to overturn. Five individuals were ejected as a result.

The SUV appeared to have rolled several times.

Authorities closed the Tucker exit on eastbound Interstate 70.

One child passenger was pronounced dead at the scene; a second child later died at the hospital. One adult and three other kids were injured in the accident. The adult was rushed to a hospital in serious condition, but was talking to medical personnel.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol is handling the investigation, police said.

Fox 2 News will have more information on this story as it becomes available.

via Fox 2 Now

 

Man robs bank inside of local Schnucks

A man robbed a US Bank inside of a Schnucks in St. Peters on Thursday.

According to police, the robbery occurred at approximately 4:30 p.m. at the Schnucks on Mid Rivers Mall Drive.

A man went into the bank, implied he had a weapon but did not show one, and demanded money.  He left with an undisclosed amount of cash.

Stay tuned to News 4 for surveillance images of the suspect.

via KMOV

 

Wife, mistress help police bust man for stealing and cheating

A husband is busted in more ways than one.

 

The Chesterfield Police Department said that 45-year-old Tony Coleman of St. Louis stole $7,500 worth of jewelry while he worked as a salesman at Kay Jewelers, formerly housed inside Chesterfield Mall.

Police said the thefts occurred between January and April of 2017.

"Kay Jewelers was doing an inventory which they do on regular occasions and they realized some jewelry was missing," said Sergeant Keith Rider, "and certain events led them to believe that it may have involved a subject named Tony Coleman.

Rider said that the stolen items included two rings and a bracelet.

"The investigation revealed that he was giving some of this jewelry to the mistress," said Rider, "she contacted the wife and everything was found out then. Mr. Coleman took back what he had given her and we have not recovered the jewelry at this time."

The department said that when officers tracked him down, Coleman denied stealing from the jewelry store but admitted to having an extramarital affair.

"When the wife and the girlfriend found out, it really helped us out and were being cooperative with us and it did not help him at all," Rider went on to say.

FOX 2 stopped by Mrs. Coleman's home late Thursday evening, but she declined to speak with us on camera. However, she told us that when she became aware about the affair and the thefts back in April, the couple immediately separated.

In a statement to FOX 2, Kay Jewelers cooperate offices said: "It's our policy not to comment on employee matters and would refer you to the police report for any information."

via Fox 2 Now

 

Why Americans—Especially Women—Are Drinking More Alcohol

More Americans are drinking high amounts of alcohol, and the greatest increases are seen among women and older adults, according to a new study published in JAMA Psychiatry.

In the new report, researchers at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism compared two large studies of people who self-reported their drinking habits. The first was a study of more than 43,000 adults from 2001-2002, and the second included more than 36,000 adults from 2012-2013.

 

The number of Americans who said they drank alcohol in the last year increased 11%. High-risk drinking—defined as having four or more drinks per day at least once a week, every week, for a year, and five or more for men—increased almost 30%. Alcohol use disorders increased nearly 50%; they were determined if a person was found to be dependent on alcohol, based on American Psychiatric Association criteria.

Though the figures represent just a snapshot in time, researchers say the increases are higher than what they've observed in prior studies.

These increases were apparent in everyone, but they were much higher in women. For men, high risk drinking increased 15% and alcohol use disorder increased close to 35%. For women, high-risk drinking increased close to 60%, and alcohol use disorder increased nearly 84%.

Older adults also appeared to be drinking substantially more than in the past. Among adults age 65 and older, high-risk drinking increased 65% and alcohol use disorders increased close to 107%. These increases were "substantial and unprecedented" compared to earlier surveys, the study authors write.

It is not yet clear why women and older adults had higher increases in this type of drinking, but the researchers have some ideas. Over the years, cultural norms about drinking have changed, and it has become more acceptable for women to drink in similar ways as men, the researchers note. "Increases in educational and occupational opportunities and rising numbers of women in the workforce" may also have contributed to higher drinking levels in the last decade, they write.

Added stress is another factor that might drive anyone, regardless of their sex, to drink more. High-risk drinking was higher among minority groups, and the authors argue that wealth inequality between minorities and whites has widened during and after the 2008 recession, which may have led to "increased stress and demoralization."

Income and educational disparities, as well as "unemployment, residential segregation, discrimination, decreased access to health care, and increased stigma associated with drinking," may also play a role, the authors write.Drinking levels in the United States have reached a "public health crisis," the researchers say, and more effort is needed to address the individual, environmental and societal factors that might be contributing.

via TIME

 

The Rate of Passengers Getting Bumped Off Flights Is Now Lower Than Its Been in Over 20 Years

Well, it looks like the outrage factory that is the Internet might have actually ACCOMPLISHED something this time . . .

 

 

According to new stats from the Department of Transportation, the rate of passengers getting bumped off flights is now at its lowest rate in over 20 YEARS.

 

 

For the first few months of the year, that wasn't true.  The rate was 0.62 people for every 10,000 passengers.

 

 

Then the video of security dragging a guy off a United flight in Chicago hit the Internet in April, and the rate started to plummet.

 

 

Between April and June, it was 0.44 people for every 10,000 passengers.  That's roughly a 30% decrease, and it's the lowest it's been since 1995.

 

 

The number of bags that get mishandled by luggage handlers is also lower than this time last year.  And according to a recent survey, overall satisfaction with the airlines is the highest it's been in 13 years.

 

 

Now if we could just get footage of someone flipping out over those checked bag fees, we'd be all set. 

 

 

(Transportation.gov)

 

Taco Bell Is Adding Spicy Pop Rocks to Their Burritos?

 

You probably haven't had Pop Rocks since you were a kid . . . putting them on your tongue, letting them pop in your mouth, and sharing urban legends about other kids who'd died because of them.

 

 

Well, here's your shot at having them as an adult.

 

 

TACO BELL just rolled out their new Firecracker Burrito, which has exploding "popping crystals" that pop with little bursts of a spicy cayenne flavor.

 

 

Right now they're testing them around California . . . and you can add the popping crystals to ANYTHING on the menu for 20 cents.

 

 

There's no word on when they could go nationwide. 

 

 

(Consumerist)

 

The Optimum Amount of Time to Dunk an Oreo Is Three Seconds

 

It's good to see some great science minds focusing on a big problem.

 

 

A team out of Utah State University has calculated the optimum amount of time to dunk an Oreo in milk.  And the answer is . . . between two and three seconds.

 

 

If you dunk it for less time, it won't absorb enough milk . . . but once you're past three seconds, it hits its max absorption point and won't take on any more, so you're just wasting your time.  Now you know. 

 

 

(Mental Floss)

 

It's good to see some great science minds focusing on a big problem.

 

 

A team out of Utah State University has calculated the optimum amount of time to dunk an Oreo in milk.  And the answer is . . . between two and three seconds.

 

 

If you dunk it for less time, it won't absorb enough milk . . . but once you're past three seconds, it hits its max absorption point and won't take on any more, so you're just wasting your time.  Now you know. 

 

 

(Mental Floss)

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