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Blog > Rizzuto Show > Rizz News > #RizzNews: Carjackers target Imo's delivery driver, are stopped by stick shift; Natalee Holloway's dad having human remains found in Aruba DNA tested; AND MORE

#RizzNews: Carjackers target Imo's delivery driver, are stopped by stick shift; Natalee Holloway's dad having human remains found in Aruba DNA tested; AND MORE

A delivery driver robbed at gunpoint taught his attackers a lesson; Don't steal what you can't control.

Three men tried getting away in a stolen car but didn't know how to drive a stick shift.

"I don't know what to tell you," said Imo's Pizza delivery driver Jon Miller. "If you deliver in this area, you just expect this to happen."

Miller's mid-90's Honda Accord is in disrepair after three young men with a gun approached him Tuesday on Nebraska Avenue near Arsenal Street, right around the corner from the Tower Grove East restaurant.

"They came up to me and said they were going to blow my f***ing head off if I didn't give them the food, so I gave them the food," said Miller.

Miller told News 4 he handed over the pizza but held onto his tips.

"They didn't take the money," said Miller. "I was ready to give them the money but they didn't ask for it. They made me tell them how to put the car in gear and then it ended up like six blocks away all blown up."

The stick-up men couldn't drive stick-shift, ditching the car and getting away on foot.

The engine is blown, but Miller is still breathing. Now, other Imo's Pizza delivery drivers are taking extra precaution.

"I just want the robbers to know that sometimes, we don't ride alone," said another Imo's employee.

"They put their lives on the line to deliver food," said Judy Riethman

Riethman is Miller's aunt, she told News 4 her nephew is no stranger to danger while delivering.

"This is not the first time he's been robbed," said Riethman. "He just keeps going back and doing it again and again."

Officers are tracking a trend of recent delivery robberies around south St. Louis.

Anyone with information on suspects can leave an anonymous tip with Crimestoppers at 314-725-8477.

via K5thehometeam.com

 

Natalee Holloway's dad having human remains found in Aruba DNA tested

 

The father of Natalee Holloway, the American teenager who disappeared in Aruba 12 years ago, revealed that he and a private investigator recently discovered human remains behind a house on the island. 

Dave Holloway and investigator T.J. Ward told Todaythat during the course of an 18-month investigation they were led to remains which are being DNA tested to determine if they belong to his daughter.  

"When we determined these remains were human, I was shocked,'' Holloway told Matt Lauer and Savannah Guthrie on the program Wednesday. "I know there's a possibility this could be someone else, and I'm just trying to wait and see."

Natalee disappeared in 2005 while on a post-graduation trip with friends. The 18-year-old was last seen outside a bar with Joran van der Sloot, who was raised in Aruba.

Van der Sloot has never been charged in Natalee's disappearance and is currently serving time for killing Peruvian student Stephany Flores. 

Holloway said they were led to the remains after an informant put them in touch with someone who allegedly had direct knowledge of Natalee's disappearance. 

"We have a person who states he was directly involved with Joran van der Sloot in disposing of Natalee's remains,'' Holloway told Today. "I thought, you know, there may be something to this."

Ward and Holloway detail their investigation in a new Oxygen series called The Disappearance of Natalee Holloway.

Holloway said if the remains belong to his daughter, “it would finally be the end.”

via usatoday.com

Poland Spring Bottled Water Accused Of Being A “Colossal Fraud”

Would you be willing to shell out a few more bucks for a product marketed as “spring” water than you would for plain old groundwater? A group of consumers say in a class-action lawsuit they wouldn’t have paid a premium for Nestlé’s Poland Spring water had they been aware it allegedly doesn’t come from natural springs in Maine.

A 325-page lawsuit [PDF] filed in Connecticut this week by eleven plaintiffs claims that for more than 20 years, Nestlé Waters’ marketing and sales of Poland Spring water has been “a colossal fraud perpetrated against American consumers.”

The average shopper associates spring water with a naturally occuring spring, signifying “purity and high quality,” the complaint says, thus allowing companies to charge a premium price compared to water that doesn’t come from a spring, like filtered tap water.

The group of plaintiffs claim that Nestlé has been selling common bottled groundwater under the Poland Spring brand since 1993 and illegally mislabeling it “100% Natural Spring Water.”

Spring water, defined

The complaint alleges that “not one drop” of Poland Spring Water emanates from a water source that complies with the Food and Drug Administration’s definition of spring water.

That standard says that water “derived from an underground formation from which water flows naturally to the surface of the earth may be ‘spring water.'” It can only be collected at the spring, or through a bore hole that taps into the underground formation feeding the spring. A natural force should also cause the water to flow to the surface “through a natural orifice.”

Any spring water that’s collected “with use of an external force” has to be from the same underground stratum as the spring, and there has to be a “measurable hydraulic connection using a hydrogeologically valid method between the bore hole and the natural spring.”

In addition, the water must have “all the physical properties, before treatment, and be of the same composition and quality, as the water that flows naturally to the surface of the earth.”

The lawsuit claims that Nestlé “misidentifies hundreds of millions of gallons of Poland Spring Water as ‘spring water,'” and has allegedly misrepresented on every Poland Spring Water label that the water in the bottle came from one or more of eight purported “natural springs” in Maine.

Common groundwater?

Rather than being collected from “pristine mountain or forest springs as the images on those labels depict, Poland Spring Water products all contain ordinary groundwater that defendant collects from wells it drilled in saturated plains or valleys where the water table is within a few feet of the earth’s surface,” the lawsuit claims.

To that end, most of the water is collected from Maine’s most populous counties in the southwestern part of the state, the complaint alleges, and not in remote natural surroundings.

The plaintiffs assert that building a well to draw water from a large aquifer that happens to feed a spring popping up elsewhere “does not qualify the well water as spring water.”

“The wells must tap the aquifer at the same layer, or stratum, from which water flows naturally into the spring, and the well water must be proven by valid scientific means to be interconnected with the water flowing at the spring,” the lawsuit claims.

The complaint also alleges that none of Nestlé’s eight sites in Maine are hydraulically connected to water that flows from the natural orifice of a genuine spring; nor do they contain water that is collected from the same underground stratum that feeds a natural spring; and no Poland Spring products contain water that has the same “physical, chemical and quality characteristics as water that flows from the natural orifice of a genuine spring.”

Noting that Nestlé bottles 1 billion gallons of Poland Spring water per year, the complaint points out that even if the eight sites the company uses to bottle water did contain a spring, it would have to flow at an average rate of 245 gallons per minute. That’s more force than a two-inch diameter fire hose spraying at 40 pounds per square inch.

“Such a spring would be plainly visible – more like a geyser than a spring – and undoubtedly well known,” the lawsuit states. “Yet there is no photographic proof that even one such spring – much less eight – exists on or near defendant’s sites in Maine.”

To that end, the complaint claims there is no historical evidence for six of the purported springs, and that two are former springs that no longer exist.

“The famous Poland Spring in Poland Spring, Maine, which Defendant’s labels claim is a source of Poland Spring Water, ran dry nearly 50 years ago, decades before Defendant bought the Poland Spring brand name,” reads the lawsuit. “The ‘spring’ Defendant now claims exists in Poland Spring is at the bottom of a lake. It has never been proven to exist, and the evidence that Defendant itself filed with Maine regulators shows it does not exist.”

The lawsuit even claims that Nestlé has taken extreme measures to fake springs on its sites, “by causing well water to flow artificially through pipes or plastic tubes into wetlands that contain no genuine springs.”

Such man-made springs don’t satisfy FDA standards, the complaint says.

As a result, Poland Spring water doesn’t qualify as spring water, “and cannot be lawfully labeled or sold as ‘spring water,’ much less as ‘100% Natural Spring Water,'” the lawsuit states. To that end, those products should be labeled and sold as “bottled water,” “drinking water,” “well water,” even “purified water” or a particular type of purified water, the complaint suggests.

The lawsuit is seeking class certification, an injunction, and at least $5 million in damages for false advertising, breach of contract, deceptive labeling, and consumer-law violations.

Nestlé defends its water

In a statement to Consumerist, a spokesperson for Nestlé Waters North America says the claims made in the lawsuit are without merit and “an obvious attempt to manipulate the legal system for personal gain.”

“Poland Spring is 100% spring water,” the statement reads. “It meets the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations defining spring water, all state regulations governing spring classification for standards of identity, as well as all federal and state regulations governing spring water collection, good manufacturing practices, product quality, and labeling. We remain highly confident in our legal position.”

via consumerist.com

 

Woman born without vagina raising money so she can have sex with boyfriend

The family of a woman born without a vagina has launched a crowdfunding campaign for surgery that would allow her to have sex with her boyfriend.

Kaylee Moats, from Arizona, suffers from Mayer Rokitansky Küster Hauser syndrome (MRKH) — which means she has no cervix, uterus or vaginal opening.

Her boyfriend of four months, Robbie Limmer, says he doesn’t care about the lack of sex in their relationship but has been putting aside $50 a month to help fund surgery that would create a vagina.

“I met Robbie in my senior year of college when I was working at the front desk. He thought I was cute so he came up to me and we started talking,” she told the Daily Mail. “It took about a month for me to tell him that I have MRKH. He was confused at first but supportive and said that it doesn’t change how he sees me.

 

“He doesn’t really focus on the sexual side of our relationship because we can’t do anything since I don’t have a vaginal opening,” she said. “But I am looking forward to having a sexual relationship. I’m not sure if I want to wait until marriage, but I think having that option there is a lot more comforting.

“I’m a bit nervous to have sex for the first time after surgery because I’m not sure if something is going to go wrong down there or if it’s going to hurt,” she said.

Moats says her vagina looks exactly how it should — except that instead of a vaginal opening, there’s a little dimpled skin where the hole should be.

She says she ovulates like other women but it gets dissolved into her ovaries.

Moats says the crowdfunding is necessary because her health insurance won’t cover the surgery.

“The fact that insurance considers this a cosmetic or a gender surgery really upsets me,” she said. “I have all the correct chromosomes of a woman so it’s not a gender or cosmetic thing because it’s not what’s outside that is different. I can’t see inside what is wrong with me.”

Her sister has even offered to carry any children Moats might want in the future if she can’t have them herself.

via nypost.com

 

Internet firms flex muscle to exile white supremacists

The wave of internet crackdowns against white nationalists and neo-Nazis reflected a rapidly changing mindset among Silicon Valley firms over policing hate speech. CloudFlare on Wednesday became one of the latest tech firms to drop coverage for the neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer. The controversial website had temporarily found a Russia-based internet domain before it became inaccessible again

Silicon Valley joined a swelling backlash against neo-Nazi groups in the United States on Wednesday as more technology companies removed white supremacists from their services in response to weekend violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Social media networks Twitter and LinkedIn, music service Spotify and security firm CloudFlare were among the companies cutting off services to hate groups or removing material that they said spread hate.

Earlier in the week, Facebook, Alphabet and GoDaddy also took steps to block hate groups.

 

The wave of internet crackdowns against white nationalists and neo-Nazis reflected a rapidly changing mindset among Silicon Valley firms on how far they are willing to go to police hate speech.

Tech companies have taken down violent propaganda from Islamic State and other militant groups, in part in response to government pressure. But most internet companies have traditionally tried to steer clear of making judgments about content except in cases of illegal activity.

CloudFlare, which protects some 6 million websites from denial-of-service attacks and hacking, on Wednesday afternoon dropped coverage of the neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer.

"I woke up this morning in a bad mood and decided to kick them off the internet," CloudFlare founder and Chief Executive Matthew Prince said in an email to employees.

CloudFlare is well-known for defending even the most distasteful websites, and services like it are essential to the functioning of websites.

Daily Stormer helped organize the weekend rally in Charlottesville where a 32-year-old woman was killed and 19 people were injured when a man plowed a car into a crowd protesting the white nationalist gathering.

Daily Stormer has been accessible only intermittently the past few days after domain providers GoDaddy and Google Domains, a unit of Alphabet, said they would not serve the website.

By Wednesday, Daily Stormer had moved to a Russia-based internet domain, with an address ending in .ru. Later in the day, though, the site was no longer accessible at that address.

Daily Stormer publisher Andrew Anglin said on a social network used by many of his supporters, Gab, that his site would be back soon.

"The CloudFlare betrayal adds another layer of super complexity. But we got this," he said. He could not immediately be reached for further comment.

Prince, the CloudFlare chief executive, said in an interview that despite his decision he was conflicted, because it could become harder to resist pressure from governments to censor.

"You don't have to play this game too many moves out to see how risky this is going to be," Prince said. "'What about this site? What about this site?'"

Only the biggest companies will be able to navigate the varying laws in different countries, he added. "We've lost a lot of the fight for a free and open internet."

Twitter on Wednesday suspended accounts linked to Daily Stormer. The company said it would not discuss individual accounts, but at least three affiliated with the Daily Stormer led to pages saying "account suspended."

The social network prohibits violent threats, harassment and hateful conduct and "will take action on accounts violating those policies," the company said in a statement.

Larger rival Facebook, which unlike Twitter explicitly prohibits hate speech, has taken down several pages from Facebook and Instagram in recent days that it said were associated with hate speech or hate organizations. It also took down the event page that was used to promote and organize the "Unite the Right" rally.

"With the potential for more rallies, we're watching the situation closely and will take down threats of physical harm," CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote on Wednesday.

Facebook also said it had removed accounts belonging to Chris Cantwell, a web commentator who has described himself as a white nationalist and said on his site that he had attended the Charlottesville rally. Cantwell's YouTube account also appeared to have been terminated.

Cantwell could not immediately be reached for comment

Silicon Valley joined a swelling backlash against neo-Nazi groups in the United States on Wednesday as more technology companies removed white supremacists from their services in response to weekend violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Social media networks Twitter and LinkedIn, music service Spotify and security firm CloudFlare were among the companies cutting off services to hate groups or removing material that they said spread hate.

Earlier in the week, Facebook, Alphabet and GoDaddy also took steps to block hate groups.

 

The wave of internet crackdowns against white nationalists and neo-Nazis reflected a rapidly changing mindset among Silicon Valley firms on how far they are willing to go to police hate speech.

Tech companies have taken down violent propaganda from Islamic State and other militant groups, in part in response to government pressure. But most internet companies have traditionally tried to steer clear of making judgments about content except in cases of illegal activity.

CloudFlare, which protects some 6 million websites from denial-of-service attacks and hacking, on Wednesday afternoon dropped coverage of the neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer.

"I woke up this morning in a bad mood and decided to kick them off the internet," CloudFlare founder and Chief Executive Matthew Prince said in an email to employees.

CloudFlare is well-known for defending even the most distasteful websites, and services like it are essential to the functioning of websites.

Daily Stormer helped organize the weekend rally in Charlottesville where a 32-year-old woman was killed and 19 people were injured when a man plowed a car into a crowd protesting the white nationalist gathering.

Daily Stormer has been accessible only intermittently the past few days after domain providers GoDaddy and Google Domains, a unit of Alphabet, said they would not serve the website.

By Wednesday, Daily Stormer had moved to a Russia-based internet domain, with an address ending in .ru. Later in the day, though, the site was no longer accessible at that address.

Daily Stormer publisher Andrew Anglin said on a social network used by many of his supporters, Gab, that his site would be back soon.

"The CloudFlare betrayal adds another layer of super complexity. But we got this," he said. He could not immediately be reached for further comment.

Prince, the CloudFlare chief executive, said in an interview that despite his decision he was conflicted, because it could become harder to resist pressure from governments to censor.

"You don't have to play this game too many moves out to see how risky this is going to be," Prince said. "'What about this site? What about this site?'"

Only the biggest companies will be able to navigate the varying laws in different countries, he added. "We've lost a lot of the fight for a free and open internet."

Twitter on Wednesday suspended accounts linked to Daily Stormer. The company said it would not discuss individual accounts, but at least three affiliated with the Daily Stormer led to pages saying "account suspended."

The social network prohibits violent threats, harassment and hateful conduct and "will take action on accounts violating those policies," the company said in a statement.

Larger rival Facebook, which unlike Twitter explicitly prohibits hate speech, has taken down several pages from Facebook and Instagram in recent days that it said were associated with hate speech or hate organizations. It also took down the event page that was used to promote and organize the "Unite the Right" rally.

"With the potential for more rallies, we're watching the situation closely and will take down threats of physical harm," CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote on Wednesday.

Facebook also said it had removed accounts belonging to Chris Cantwell, a web commentator who has described himself as a white nationalist and said on his site that he had attended the Charlottesville rally. Cantwell's YouTube account also appeared to have been terminated.

Cantwell could not immediately be reached for comment.

LinkedIn, a unit of Microsoft, suspended a page devoted to Daily Stormer and another page belonging to a man associated with the site, Andrew Auernheimer. LinkedIn declined to comment.

Reddit this week eliminated one of its discussion communities that supported the Unite the Right rally, saying that the company would ban users who incite violence.

Spotify, based in Sweden, said it was in the process of removing musical acts from its streaming service that had been flagged as racist "hate bands" by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

"Illegal content or material that favors hatred or incites violence against race, religion, sexuality or the like is not tolerated by us," the company said in a statement, adding that record companies should also be held responsible.

via cnbc.com

 

It Looks Like Chuck E. Cheese's Is Killing Off Their Animatronic Animal Band

 

This is NOT FAIR.  If I had to be traumatized as a kid by the animatronic animals at Chuck E. Cheese's, then future generations of kids have to suffer it too.

 

But it looks like that's not going to happen.  Chuck E. Cheese's just got rid of the animatronic animal bands in four locations in San Antonio.  Three locations in Kansas City, Missouri are next.  And soon enough, they'll probably be wiped out everywhere.

 

The CEO says they're phasing them out because, quote, "The kids stopped looking at the animatronics years and years ago, and they would wait for the live Chuck E. to come out."  MY generation didn't have the option to look away. 

 

 

(CBS News)

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